ascii code comparison table numeric

ASCII number correspondence table

As shown.

The so-called ASCII and hexadecimal are just conceptual things, in the computer through the binary, the conversion should be the conversion of the output, the same is a number, in the computer memory to indicate that it is the same, only the output is not the same ASCII is for the encoding of the characters, almost the keyboard on the encoding of the characters.

Mathematical calculations:

Main entry: Conversion

Decimal to hexadecimal

Take the remainder theorem decomposition, for example, will be converted from 487710 to hexadecimal:

4877 ÷ 16 = 304…. .13(D)

304÷16=19… .0

19÷16=1… .3

1÷16=0… .1

This counts to 487710=130D16

What are the ASCII codes for characters A through Z?

①The ASCII codes for uppercase characters A to Z are 065 to 090, character plus one, code plus one

②The ASCII codes for lowercase characters a to z are 097 to 122, still character plus one, code plus one

The following chart shows the ASCII code correspondences of common characters

Extended Information

32 to 126 (total 95) are characters (32 is a space), of which 48 to 57 are the ten Arabic numerals from 0 to 9.

65 to 90 are 26 uppercase letters of the alphabet, 97 to 122 are 26 lowercase letters of the alphabet, and the rest are some punctuation marks, arithmetic symbols and so on.

Also note that in standard ASCII, the highest bit (b7) is used as the parity bit. The so-called parity check is a method used to check for errors in the code transmission process, and is generally divided into two types of checksums: odd and even.

Odd parity rule: the correct code in a byte of the number of 1 must be odd, if not odd, then in the highest bit b7 add 1; even parity rule: the correct code in a byte of the number of 1 must be even, if not even, then in the highest bit b7 add 1.

The ASCII codes corresponding to hexadecimal digits 1 through 9 are

The ASCII codes corresponding to hexadecimal digits 1 through 9 are 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39.

ASCII Code Comparison Table of 26 Alphabetic and Numeric Symbols

a-z: 97-122, A-Z: 65-90, 0-9: 48-57.

ASCII code uses a specified combination of 7-bit or 8-bit binary numbers to represent 128 or 256 possible characters.

0 to 31 and 127 (33 in total) are control characters or communication-specific characters (the rest are displayable characters), such as control characters: LF (Line Feed), CR (Carriage Return), FF (Page Feed), DEL (Delete), BS (Backspace), BEL (Ringing), etc.; communication-specific characters: SOH (Header), EOT (End of Text), ACK (Acknowledgement), etc.;

32 to 126 (a total of 95) are characters (32 is a space), of which 48 to 57 for 0 to 9 ten Arabic numerals;

65 to 90 for the 26 uppercase letters of the English alphabet, 97 to 122 for the 26 lowercase letters of the English alphabet, and the rest of some punctuation marks, arithmetic symbols, etc..

Causes

In computers, all data are stored and calculated using binary numbers (because computers use high and low levels to represent 1 and 0, respectively), for example, 52 letters like a, b, c, and d (including uppercase), as well as numbers such as 0, 1, etc. There are also a number of commonly used symbols (e.g., *, #, @, etc.) stored in computers. computers are also represented using binary numbers when stored in computers.

Which binary digits are used to indicate which symbols, of course, everyone can agree on their own set (which is called coding), and if we want to communicate with each other without causing confusion, then we must use the same coding rules, so the U.S. standardization organizations have introduced the ASCII encoding, which unifies the above commonly used symbols with the binary digits to indicate.

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